Sunday, October 4, 2015

Attai Othello Act 5 Summary Response

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Othello by William Shakespeare exhibits the power of words and how its presence can be utilized to harm another.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • As the conflicts in the play reach their climax, the verbal tensions between the characters are expressed in their final expulsions.
    • Antagonist Iago’s final comments to his master, Othello, regarding the false scandal involving Othello’s wife, Desdemona, ultimately leads Othello to murder Desdemona. Iago’s power of words over Roderigo, his presumed ally, also leads to Roderigo’s death in this final act of the play.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • Clearly, the sly state of words such as those used by characters in William Shakespeare’s Othello can maim the life of one or more individuals.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author,,correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays___(Main Idea)________ because ___________ .
    • Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words because its presence can psychologically alter another.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • In Act 5 of the play, Iago, the primary antagonist, has secured verbal power over multiple characters. Othello, the initial protagonist and Iago’s master, is among the most influenced by Iago’s sly comments. Due to his trust in Iago, Othello is persuaded that his wife, Desdemona, is having an affair with another man. As his exasperation and sense of indignation increase, he is again convinced by Iago’s words to not only punish Desdemona, but to penalize her to highest extremity: death. Othello’s frustration allows him to complete the murder, and those closest to Othello and Desdemona respond subsequently.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • Lodovico, Desdemona’s cousin from Venice, describes the changes he has identified in Othello as he recapitulates, “O thou Othello that [wert] once so good, fall’n in the practice of a [damned] slave…” (Shakespeare 5.2. 259).  
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • After Othello murders Desdemona, Lodovico makes a crucial observation. He swiftly, directly summarizes how Othello’s demeanor, personality, and overall character has been altered following his arrival in Cyprus. Specifically, Lodovico remarks how Othello was once known as a good individual, and then abruptly transformed into a new man. Othello became an angered slave of man as a result of an external force. He has been shaped into a violent, infuriated individual. What is unknown by Lodovico and most of the other characters is the Iago, who over time accumulated Othello’s trust, has been using the power and trust in his words to brainwash Othello of his virtues. He is the primary reason for Othello’s physiological transformation from gentle to violent, and he is the icon who best represents the verbal power that one can inflict to cause pain to others such as brainwashed Othello.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
      • However, Othello, under certain circumstances, incorrectly portrays the immediate impact of powerful words. One of these instances is after Othello discovers the truth behind Iago’s accusations against Desdemona.
      • Emilia, Iago’s wife and Desdemona’s attendant, confesses the truth and proves that Iago is guilty. Othello is astonished and infuriated by the hoax that has been placed into his mind by his trusted servant and now lieutenant. As this quandary is explained in more detail, Othello’s personality "mask" created by Iago does not fade. This is shown as he stabs Iago for the fallacies he has bestowed onto him. However, the stabbing does not kill Iago.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
      • Othello’s continuation of his new demeanor is presented as he explain to Iago, “I am not sorry neither. I’d have thee live, for in my sense ‘tis happiness to die” (Shakespeare 5.2. 259).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Othello, who was mentally maimed by Iago prior to his downfall, persists in his violent actions despite the new information delivered to him about Iago. After learning that Iago manipulated him through his trusted words, he explains that he to let Iago die would mean that he would win in happiness. Othello feels in this moment that Iago must live with his guilt as punishment, for death is not the torture he seeks for what Iago. Othello had been consistently impacted by the power of words in the past, such as a truth or assumed truth with Iago, but now he has ceased to follow is usual norm. Othello does not automatically retain his original demeanor as readers know from the beginning of the play. He maintains his identity that Iago formulated for him earlier in the play, which shows how the power of words will not always change the mental state of another.
What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • At first glance, one could argue that Othello is not entirely vulnerable to the power of words.
    • This way of making sense of the position makes a degree of sense. If Othello was always vulnerable to the words of others, he would not have gone on to  behave identically when Iago is proven guilty. Othello demands that Iago be tortured rather than simply imprisoned or punished in another form such as how he handled the violent fight between Roderigo and Cassio upon arriving in Cyprus. Othello normally removes one’s title after a violent occurrence like Cassio’s. This change in his normal reaction shows that he is still mentally violent and unchanged by the power of Emilia’s truthful words.
    • But it is more complicated than that. Othello, who was mentally maimed by Iago, expresses signs of his original personality after he is told the truth about Iago through his own narration. The sudden return of Othello’s physiological state is expressed by him as he exclaims, “Whip me, you devils, from the possession of this heavenly sight! Blow me about in winds, roast me in sulfur, wash me in steep-down gulfs of liquid fire! O Desdemona! Dead, Desdemona! Dead…” (Shakespeare 5.2. 259). This expression of guilt is very similar to his actions in Act 1 in front of Brabantio, Desdemona’s father. He pleaded to the court and informed them to put his life on the line with his words. This similarity in the expressions shows how Othello has not changed in this instance. He has pleaded to the court of devils to jeopardize his life due to his wrongdoings. This goes on to show how new words will change Othello’s perspective of Desdemona from anger to innocence as a result of his reaction. He may appear unchanged on the outside in his actions, but inside, Othello's personality is restored. Therefore, Othello is eventually psychologically changed by the power of words, whether it is for the benefit or of the doubt.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates the power of words and how it’s positive or negative intentions can impact the behavioral properties of another.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

REDO Attai Othello Act 2 Summary Response (3)

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Othello by William Shakespeare delves into manipulation and how its properties can be used against a victim.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • As conflicts rise in the play, Iago, the primary antagonist, applies manipulation through Cassio and Roderigo.
    • Throughout the story, Iago persuades both men to complete tasks that prove to have outcomes that help execute the initial steps in his revenge scheme against Othello.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • Clearly, when manipulation is present such as in Shakespeare’s play, Othello, its presence can be used to change the life of another.


Response:
  • Topic sentence:
    • Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays manipulation because it can lead to a negative result for the victim or victims.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Iago is the primary antagonist in the play. He is an ancient of Othello, Iago’s master who is also a widely acclaimed commander. After Othello selects Michael Cassio, a young and inexperienced soldier, to succeed as his officer, Iago develops a hatred for both Othello and Cassio. In his scheme to gain revenge over both men, Iago plans to intoxicate Cassio in Cyprus before his nightly guarding shift commences.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • Iago expands on this plan as he depicts, “If I can fasten but one cup upon him with that which he hath drunk tonight already, He’ll be full of quarrel and offense as my mistress’ dog...Now, ‘mongst this flock of drunkards am I to put our Cassio in some action that may offend the isle. But here they come. If consequence do but approve my dream, my boat sails freely both with wind and stream” (Shakespeare 2.3. 85).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago, who is aware of Cassio’s sensitivity to alcohol, plans to convince him to drink a glass of wine before his shift. This will not only enable Iago to manipulate him, but also give Othello an additional reason to ridicule Cassio. Cassio, being very reactant to the wine, will become mentally weak upon drinking. Iago then can use Cassio’s vulnerable nature to instigate a quarrel in which he will offend the isle of Cyprus. As a result of this immoral behavior, Othello will see the need to penalize Cassio, and will thus be adventitiously beneficial for Iago by advancing his revenge plan to the next phase.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up
      • However, Iago occasionally incorrectly portrays manipulation. One instance is when he defends Cassio in front of Othello after Cassio engages in a fight.
      • While Cassio was drunk, Roderigo initiated a cataclysm. Othello walks in on the scene and Cassio is caught in the middle of the act. Ashamed and obfuscated, he asks Iago to recall and explain the event. Instead of delivering the story in a manner that describes Cassio as the scapegoat, Iago defends Cassio’s honor.
    • Evidence:
      • Iago explains to Othello, “I’d rather have this tongue cut from my mouth than it should do offense to Michael Cassio. Yet I persuade myself, to speak the truth shall nothing wrong him” (Shakespeare 2.3. 236-239).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago supports Cassio to prove his loyalty to him, claiming he would rather be hurt than take away his honor. He speaks only to please Othello and extenuate the situation he walked into. Iago uses a more objective approach to explaining the situation and thus eliminates his manipulative tactics around Othello. Therefore, because Iago spoke to Othello directly about the situation and made no effort to manipulate Othello, manipulation is incorrectly portrayed.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • At first glance, one could argue based upon certain portions of the play that Iago is faithful to Cassio and that he wants Cassio to keep his position as lieutenant.
    • One can not deny that Iago defends Cassio in a public matter in front of his commander as well as explains the quarrel in such a way that would not harm Cassio. At multiple points in the story, such as the clash highlighting Cassio, Iago is withdrawn and simply observes the events. His actions do not directly start the physical conflicts.
    • However, it is more complicated than that. Iago deliberately manipulated Cassio and then acted as if he had done nothing wrong. This was to create his desired result, which is the swift removal of Cassio’s title. As a result, Othello and Cassio thought that he was trustworthy when he was really a twisted liar. Iago manipulated Cassio so that he would feel tense from his offered dosage of alcohol. The wine can be thought of as Iago. Iago’s negative influence and manipulative tactics are encompassed in the wine, and once Cassio ingests the wine, he ingests all of Iago’s negative power. He becomes Iago’s fool, and is henceforth under Iago’s control. Although Cassio’s actions are not directly controlled by Iago, his behavior in front of Othello is directly linked back to Iago himself. Therefore, Iago’s actions and words expressed in front of Cassio and Othello are all different representations of his manipulative characteristics.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates the power of manipulation and how it can create a disadvantageous outcome for the targeted subjects.


Thursday, September 17, 2015

Attai/Jordan Act 2 Summary Response (3)

Summary Response Outline

Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Othello by William Shakespeare delves into the power of manipulation and how its properties can be used against a victim.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas
    • As conflicts rise in the play, Iago, the primary antagonist, applies manipulative tactics through Cassio and Roderigo.
    • Throughout the story, Iago persuades both men to complete tasks that prove to have outcomes that help execute the initial steps in his revenge scheme against Othello.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • Clearly, when manipulation is present such as in Shakespeare’s play, Othello, its power, as discovered by readers, can be used to change the life of another.

Response:
  • Topic sentence:
    • Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays manipulation because it can lead to a negative result for the victim or victims.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Iago is the primary antagonist in the play. He is an ancient of Othello, Iago’s master who is also a widely acclaimed commander. After Othello selects Michael Cassio, a young and inexperienced soldier, to succeed as his officer, Iago develops a hatred for both Othello and Cassio. In his scheme to gain revenge over both men, Iago plans to intoxicate Cassio in Cyprus before his nightly guarding shift commences.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (Shakespeare 1.2.13-17).
      • Iago expands on this plan as he depicts, “If I can fasten but one cup upon him with that which he hath drunk tonight already, He’ll be full of quarrel and offense as my mistress’ dog...Now, ‘mongst this flock of drunkards am I to put our Cassio in some action that may offend the isle. But here they come. If consequence do but approve my dream, my boat sails freely both with wind and stream” (Shakespeare 2.3. 85).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago, who is aware of Cassio’s sensitivity to alcohol, plans to convince him to drink a glass of wine before his shift. This will not only enable Iago to manipulate him, but also give Othello an additional reason to ridicule Cassio. Cassio, being very reactant to the wine, will become mentally weak upon drinking. Iago then can use Cassio’s vulnerable nature to instigate a quarrel in which he will offend the isle of Cyprus. As a result of this immoral behavior, Othello will see the need to penalize Cassio, and will thus be adventitiously beneficial for Iago by advancing his revenge plan to the next phase.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up
      • However, Iago occasionally incorrectly portrays manipulation. One instance is when he defends Cassio in front of Othello after Cassio engages in a fight.
      • While Cassio was drunk, Roderigo initiated a cataclysm. Othello walks in on the scene and Cassio is caught in the middle of the act. Ashamed and obfuscated, he asks Iago to recall and explain the event. Instead of delivering the story in a manner that describes Cassio as the scapegoat, Iago defends Cassio’s honor.
    • Evidence:
      • Iago explains to Othello, “I’d rather have this tongue cut from my mouth than it should do offense to Michael Cassio. Yet I persuade myself, to speak the truth shall nothing wrong him” (Shakespeare 2.3 236-239).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: explain quote, connect to claim
      • Iago supports Cassio to prove his loyalty to him, claiming he would rather be hurt than take away his honor. He speaks only to please Othello and extenuate the situation he walked into. Iago uses a more objective approach to explaining the situation and thus eliminates his manipulative tactics around Othello. Therefore, because Iago spoke to Othello directly about the situation and made no effort to manipulate Othello, manipulation is incorrectly portrayed.
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • At first glance, one could argue based upon certain portions of the play that Iago is faithful to Cassio and that he wants Cassio to keep his position as lieutenant.
    • We can not deny that Iago defends Cassio in a public matter in front of his commander as well as explains the quarrel in such a way that would not harm Cassio. At multiple points in the story, such as the clash highlighting Cassio, Iago is withdrawn and simply observes the events. His actions do not directly start the physical conflicts.
    • However, it is more complicated than that. Iago deliberately manipulated Cassio and then acted as if he had done nothing wrong. This was to create his desired result, which is the swift removal of Cassio’s title. As a result, Othello and Cassio thought that he was trustworthy when he was really a twisted liar. Iago manipulated Cassio so that he would feel tense from his offered dosage of alcohol. The wine can be thought of as Iago. Iago’s negative influence and manipulative tactics are encompassed in the wine, and once Cassio ingests the wine, he ingests all of Iago’s negative power. He becomes Iago’s fool, and is henceforth under Iago’s control. Although Cassio’s actions are not directly controlled by Iago, his behavior in front of Othello is directly linked back to Iago himself. Therefore, Iago’s actions and words expressed in front of Cassio and Othello are all different representations of his manipulative characteristics.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, William Shakespeare’s Othello demonstrates the power of manipulation and how it can create a disadvantageous outcome for the targeted subjects.

REDO Attai Act 1 Summary Response (2)

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Othello by William Shakespeare explores the progression of revenge through the conflicting actions displayed by the characters.
  • Supporting ideas and explanations to prove main ideas (example and explanation/elaboration of example)
    • The maelstrom of emotions expressed by main characters Iago, Roderigo, and Othello set the tone for the story’s conflicts.
    • Othello, a renown black lieutenant in Venice, made decisions that instigated conflict with Iago, a loyal ancient of Othello who desires a higher military rank, and Roderigo, a man who is desperate to regain the love of Othello’s wife, Desdemona
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In his play, Othello, Shakespeare illustrates how these characters’ colliding actions lead to revenge throughout the story.
Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays) because ___________ .
    • Othello, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays how one will change their identity to gain revenge, because the subtlety and unexpectedness of revenge can unexpectedly lead to the demise of another.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • Iago is one of the main antagonists and characters in the play. He possesses a great deal of military knowledge and skill, but is underutilized as an ancient, or servant, to the praised Othello. After a position as an officer alongside Othello was vacant, Iago hoped that he would be selected as a result of his loyalty and skill by Othello. Unfortunately, Othello gave the position to a man named Cassio, which Iago believed to be inexperienced and unqualified for the officer role. In order to gain revenge on Othello for his “misjudgment”, Iago places a “mask” over himself.
    • Evidence: Lead-in “ quotation” (       )
      • Iago discloses this information about his plan as he explains, “He holds me well. The better shall my purpose work on him...The Moor is of a free and open nature that thinks men honest that but seem to be so, and will as tenderly be led by th’ nose as asses are ” (Shakespeare 1.3 55).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
      • Because Iago has proven himself to be trustworthy and loyal to Othello, he formulates a plan to utilize a “new identity” to retaliate against the hated Moor Othello. He applies a shield of innocence over himself, completing the initial steps of his plot. He will use the good, trusting nature of Othello to hurt him in an undetected manner, which he plans will result in Othello’s downfall and lead to his succession of power.
  • Counterclaim 1: However,
    • Set-up
      • However, a change in identity to obtain revenge is not entirely portrayed correctly in the story. Iago does not conceal his true identity around Roderigo. Roderigo is a young, wealthy, and foolish man who has experienced a prolonged love for Desdemona, a Venetian woman now married to Othello. Angered by this recent development, Roderigo plans to gain revenge on Othello by winning back Desdemona’s heart while the couple is in Cyprus. This will be done with Iago’s aid.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
      • Iago helps develop Roderigo’s plan by explaining to him, “Put money in thy purse. Follow thou the wars; defeat thy favor with an usurped beard...It cannot be that Desdemona should (long) continue her love to the Moor--put money in thy purse--nor he his to her” (Shakespeare 1.3 51).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
      • In order for Iago to execute his plan, he requires an alliance with Roderigo. Roderigo’s wealth makes funding accessible and beneficial for him. Iago requires Roderigo’s involvement to execute his plan, so he introduces the idea of saving money “in thy purse” to help bring Roderigo out of his depressed state. In this instance, Iago does not go incognito in front of Roderigo. Iago is honest to Roderigo about what he must do and what he must remember. He speaks to Roderigo directly with his sincerity and seriousness, for he is in dire need of his ally’s help as much as his ally requires his. Because Iago dismisses his mask and presents himself to Roderigo in this state of purity, the stated necessity to change one’s identity to obtain revenge is incorrectly portrayed.


  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? (use rebuttal progression language)
    • At first glance, the use of masking and altering one’s identity is not applied in the advancement of the play. Shortcomings within the antagonist, Iago, prevent him from maintaining a selected identity as he proceeds in executing retaliation.
    • This position seems reasonable, for Iago depicts weakness in Roderigo’s presence at times. Roderigo, being as sensitive and insecure as he is, complicates Iago’s plan. Iago is the reason why Roderigo has presented such determination to win back Desdemona. Alone, Iago must place a mask over himself to execute his plan, but Roderigo’s last minute crises disrupt that transition, requiring Iago to dismiss his identity and rebuild Roderigo’s confidence. His caring, supportive nature is needed to keep Roderigo strong, so he must therefore retain his original identity and reestablish faith in Roderigo. Both of their plans rely on each other.
    • However, Iago holds back certain information regarding his true intentions for Roderigo. Although it may appear that Iago is honest and true to Roderigo, he applies a mask in front of his dear ally when he deceitfully confronts him. Iago is truthful when he convinces Roderigo to engage in certain acts, but subtly implies alternative results. From what is heard, Iago is bona fide in his words to other characters, but additional information and analytical processes show how Iago’s “good nature” is cut off by a shield that suggests otherwise. His revenge plot is reinforced by the positive reputation he has created, which allows him to manipulate others and lead them to their downfall through their trust in his new and old identities.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
Clearly, through Iago’s continuous presentations of a false identity in William Shakespeare’s Othello, readers can explore the strategic, hidden masks that one will apply to gain revenge over another.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

REDO #2 Attai Bully Summary Response (1)

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
    • Bully by Lee Hirsch introduces viewers to the to realities present in the everyday lives of bullied children and adolescents.


  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
    • The film consists of documented footage through the perspectives of five bullied children dispersed in public schools throughout the United States.


  • Explanation of ideas (example)
    • Although the subjects range from 11 to 17 years old, all of their stories reflect the influential properties that bullying can have on one’s life.
    • In some cases, the treatment of the victims was subsided by pulling the student out of school, moving to a new community, or ultimately death by suicide.
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • Clearly, when the reality of bullying is disclosed such as in Bully by Lee Hirsch, individuals realize the presence and duration of bullying in modern society.
Response:
_
R
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
    • Bully, a film by by Lee Hirsch, correctly portrays the severity of the consequences of bullying, because it can lead to depression.


  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
      • This film shows bullying through the lives of many victims. The bullies do not know how much they are damaging their targets. One of these instances is presented through the experience of 16 year old female Kelby. Kelby is gay, and is not widely accepted in her community. This social rejection is most concentrated in her school in Oklahoma. She has been laughed at, criticized, and mentally abused as a result of her lifestyle (and beliefs). At one point, she cut herself and also attempted suicide three times. This negativity was also present in her own family until recent events proved to Kelby’s parents that her pain was only magnified in a home environment.
  • Evidence: Lead-in
    • During an interview in the film, Kelby’s father elucidates,“You don’t know what a person’s been through until you walk a mile in their shoes” (Hirsch).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
      • The bullies do not know the impact of their bullying until they live a day in their victim’s life. After hearing about the pain that Kelby endured inside and outside of school, Kelby’s father was aware of the issue that was present in his daughter’s life. Unfortunately, when the negative series of events spun into a fierce maelstrom, Kelby’s father not only was aware of the predicament, but experienced its darkness. At one point, Kelby’s realities entered his life, making it seem as if he was living Kelby’s life. This shows the horror and the misjudgment of bullying that is perceived through the myriad styles of shoes in the store we call life.
  • Counterclaim 1: However,
    • Set-up
      • The circumstances in which bullying is present are not always correctly portrayed in the film. When the subjects’ school and home environment are analyzed, it can be inferred from the appearances of their homes, neighborhoods, and parental behaviors that the bullied children in the film belong to the middle and lower classes. This creates a perceptual image that only children in economically lower classes are bullied. An experience from a bullied child in a higher economic class is not included in the film. This left out perspective is mentioned in an interview with one of the parents of the subjects, Kelby. Kelby’s father explains in this interview,


    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
      • “If a politician’s child died because he was picked on at his public school, there would be a law passed the next day” (Hirsch).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
      • Kelby’s father makes a valid point that there are children that are bullied in more opulent families. These children normally have more parental and economic power to discontinue their treatment. This experience is not filmed in the documentary, and thus incorrectly portrays a VARIETY of experiences.  


  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Rebuttal progression
    • A common understanding in this film is that if a son of a man with power is being bullied, there would be a fight against bullying the next day.  This seems reasonable because if the guardian of a victim is a politician, he/she will not be happy about the treatment of their minor. They will want to defend their kid and work on getting a law passed against bullying. However, most of the people that are being bullied are the children of people who do not have power. Their voice will not be heard if they try and stop bullying as shown by various efforts in the film. As a result of this, the root or roots of the conflict, the bullies, are unaware of the true pain that they are inflicting on the victims. Without the presence of superior power, the bullies proceed with their demeanors, unaware of the consequences for them and the victim. They disregard the thoughts of immorality in their actions. These events commonly subside on the rare occasion of a powerful guardian’s involvement, which in the film and in real life, is as said: very rare.

  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
    • In conclusion, bullying is happening in many schools today across the country, and has a negative impact on one’s life as demonstrated by Lee Hirsch in his eye opening film, Bully.